Viome Studies

VRI has a comprehensive clinical research program that has already enrolled more than 10,000 study participants in more than 20 chronic disease areas. Our clinical research programs generate accurate clinical and molecular data from people with different conditions and healthy participants. Using artificial intelligence and machine learning we gain a deeper insight into the root causes of chronic diseases. The goals of VRI clinical research programs are to develop:

  • Better diagnostic tests that can identify early signs and symptoms of diseases, so we can prevent the disease, instead of managing the symptoms.
  • Find new molecular markers of disease.
  • Better companion diagnostic tests, which will help identify the best choice of therapy.
  • Precision nutritional therapies that include diet and supplements and are solely based on the high-resolution data obtained from each person, and not generic recommendations for everyone.

A list of our active studies is below, please click the links to find out more information including terms and conditions for each study

Active Studies

Active

V-174 Study: A study of vaginal microbiome compositions and functions

Viome is developing a novel vaginal microbiome test. To better understand what microorganisms are present in vaginal samples, and what they are doing we have launched a study seeking to investigate the vaginal microbiome in a large and diverse population.

Active

V-150 Study: Role of the gut microbiome in Axial Spondyloarthropathy

We would like to understand the role of the microbiome in Axial Spondyloarthropathy (AxSpA) disease activity. We hypothesize that AxSpA relapses are caused by the expression of specific microbial proteins within the human microbiome community. These proteins may be a part of biochemical pathways, gene expression regulatory mechanisms, or simply display an epitope that can elicit an autoimmune response via molecular mimicry.

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Active

V-118/V112 Study: Understanding gut-brain interactions

The gut microbiome has been associated with cognition as well as many different neurological diseases and disorders. This study will seek to better understand the connection between the gut and the brain (the gut-brain axis). This study is currently only available to Viome customers.

Active

V-146 Study: Understanding the role of the microbiome in autoimmune diseases

The goal of this study is to better understand the role of the microbiome in autoimmune disease progression and the molecular features that may contribute to disease relapse (flares) and to determine if there are specific microbes found in the microbiome that may contribute to disease activity. This study is currently only available to Viome customers.

Active

V-136 study: Understanding the role of the microbiome in the prediction of diabetes and people's risk of developing diabetes.

The goal of this study is to determine if the microbiome can be predictive of an individual’s risk to developing Type II Diabetes. This study is currently only available to Viome customers.

Active

V-179 study: Understanding adherence to Viome’s personalized nutrition program and improvements in general wellness.

The goal of this study is to understand how well customers follow their results and recommendations (R&R) to define an adherence score and to determine how adherence to Viome R&R improves general well-being. This study is currently only available to Viome customers.

Active

V-202.3 Covid-19 Wellness Survey: Understand the role of the microbiome in health and wellness during the SARS-CoV-2 outbreak.

The goal of this study is to determine the effects of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, on general health and wellness. This brief survey asks questions about ones’ general health, symptoms one may have experienced, and nutritional habits.

Completed Studies

Completed

V-109 Study: Predicting the glycemic response to food using the Viome Gut Intelligence test

The purpose of the study is to collect and analyze physiological, physical, and molecular data from a diverse population to increase our understanding of how such parameters are associated with postprandial glycemic response.